Galapagos

The Ultimate Wildlife Destination

“The place is like a new creation: the birds and beasts do not get out of our way; the pelicans and sea-lions look in our faces as if we had no right to intrude on their solitude; the small birds are so tame that they hop upon our feet; and all this amidst volcanoes which are burning around us on either hand. Altogether it is as wild and desolate a scene as imagination can picture.”

– Lord George Bryon, Diary entry Friday March 25, 1825, Voyage of H. M. S. Blonde to the Sandwich Islands, in the years 1824-1825

An up-close-and-personal Wildlife Vacation

One of the astonishing things about the Galapagos Islands is that the wildlife remains just as fearless of humans today as it did in the time of Lord Byron, despite our rising populations. It is these close-up encounters with the ‘birds and beasts’ that makes these remote islands such a unique and sought-after wildlife destination. The Islands also serve as a reminder that we, humans, are animals too and that we can learn a lot about ourselves and each other from simply being mindful and fully present in nature.

One of the many reasons we fell in love with the Galapagos in the first place was the connection we felt to the land and its wildlife. The moment we climbed a tree and saw the magnificent views from what is now our camp, we knew we had found a very special place indeed. Since those early days, our mission has always remained the same. We want to offer our guests an authentic, timeless Galapagos wildlife experience, one which Lord Bryon might have even experienced himself.

Among The Wild Things

Nestled in the rugged highlands of Santa Cruz Island, in the heart of the archipelago, Galapagos Safari Camp is a wildlife destination in itself. Home to numerous bird species, and the occasional giant tortoise, our camp is an ideal base for wildlife lovers who wish to explore the islands’ remarkable flora and fauna at their own pace.

“Galapagos Safari Camp reminds me of the original Galapagos”
– Johanna Angermeyer, author of My Father’s Island.

Our Land-Based Safaris include many wildlife sites on Santa Cruz as well as visiting sites on uninhabited islands and snorkeling sites in the Galapagos Marine Reserve. On our Safaris you will encounter extraordinary, often endemic, and sometimes very curious creatures who have adapted to the demanding conditions of these remote islands, stranded in the vast blues of the Pacific Ocean.

Galapagos Wildlife:

Flagship Species

Below we list the Flagship Species you will have an opportunity to encounter on your Land-Based Safari. As with any wildlife vacation, it is not possible for us to guarantee sightings of specific species but we do work with the islands’ top naturalists who have many years of experience in guiding wildlife tours in the Galapagos, and who can spot a well camouflaged creature better than anyone.

Wildlife viewing opportunities will also be determined by the itinerary you choose and the islands you visit. For more information and advice, please contact one of our expert Galapagos Safari travel consultants.

PLAN YOUR SAFARI

TOP 10 SPECIES

Blue-footed Booby

  • BIRDS
  • LBS
  • LC

Blue-footed boobies are perhaps best known for their clown-like dance, in which males show-off their over-sized, aqua-blue feet to females with a high-step strut back and forth.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

Although blue-footed boobies can be found on Santa Cruz, one of the best places to see them is on North Seymour, a little islet that is easy to reach from Galapagos Safari Camp and one that is often included in our Land-Based Itineraries.

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Galapagos Finch

  • BIRDS
  • GSC
  • LBS
  • E
  • LC

They are small and cute and feathered, for sure, but don’t usually leave us in awe. Everyone will get to see at least one, if not several Galapagos finches on their Safari. But their significance belies their small size, as Darwin was to discover after his visit to the Galapagos.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

One of the best places to see Galapagos finches is at Galapagos Safari Camp. Here they flutter around the trees and may even hop onto the dining tables at breakfast time. After a few days you will be able to identify individual finches (when our children visit they even like to give them names!) Even David Attenborough chose to film a piece-to-camera about the Galapagos finches and the general tameness of animals in the Islands at our camp’s swimming pool (another favorite spot with our resident finches!)

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Galapagos Giant Tortoise

  • REPTILE
  • GSC
  • LBS
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  • CE

The most iconic reptile of the Galapagos is the Giant Tortoise, and it is what the islands are named after. Galapago, is a Spanish word for tortoise. It is also a type of saddle resembling a tortoise’s shell.

Scientists believe that the tortoise drifted to the Galapagos Islands two to three million years ago and evolved into several sub-species, each unique to a specific island. The Pinta Island tortoise (C.abingdonii) is one such example. Unfortunately, however, the introduction of goats in the ‘50s destroyed much of the island’s vegetation and as a result, wiped out this particular species. The last living individual died in June 2012. Aptly named ‘Lonesome George’, he can now be found on display at the Charles Darwin Research Station.

There are currently 12 species of giant tortoise in the Galapagos Islands, two of which are native to Santa Cruz – the Eastern Santa Cruz Giant Tortoise and Western Santa Cruz Giant Tortoise, both of which are listed by IUCN as Critically Endangered.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

There are an estimated 3000 giant tortoises on the island of Santa Cruz, and most are found in the highlands. As you drive up the dirt track that leads to Galapagos Safari Camp you will likely encounter a giant tortoise or two munching on leaves at the side of the road. Often they enter the camp itself and can be seen foraging under our safari tents.

Besides Galapagos Safari Camp, one of the best places to observe them in the wild is in the neighboring tortoise reserve that borders our camp. We like to take our guests to one of the lesser-known parts of the reserve, away from the coach-loads of tourists. Not only is it a more intimate wildlife experience but it also has one of the island’s most impressive lava tunnels which is worth exploring.

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Galapagos Hawk

  • Bird
  • GSC
  • LBS
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  • VU

The Galapagos Hawk is one of the world’s rarest birds of prey and the Islands’ top predator. With around 250 – 330 mature individuals, spotting one is a true Galapagos Safari highlight.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

One of the best places to see them on our Land-Based Safari is on the island of Santa Fe where the hawks are often found perching atop the trees, surveying the land. A few years ago they even made their mark on Galapagos Safari Camp (by killing our chickens!) but it’s been a while since anyone has seen one at camp. A relief, maybe, for our handful of chickens, but deeply concerning for the species. The IUCN now categories them as ‘Vulnerable’ (at high risk of becoming extinct).

Galapagos Land Iguana

  • Reptile
  • LBS
  • E
  • VU
  • CE

It’s thought that there are between 5000-10,000 land iguanas in Galapagos today. They are usually found living in small colonies in the drier parts of the archipelago where they can feed on low-lying, and often prickly vegetation such as cacti.

Land Iguanas sleep in shallow underground burrows that they stay close to day and night. In The Voyage of the Beagle, Charles Darwin wrote, “…when we were left at James Island, we could not for some time find a spot free from their burrows on which to pitch our single tent. Like their brothers the sea-kind, they are ugly animals, of a yellowish orange beneath, and of a brownish red colour above: from their low facial angle they have a singularly stupid appearance.”

WHERE TO SEE THEM

There are 3 species of land iguanas in the Galapagos, two of which – the Common Land Iguana and the Santa Fe Land Iguana – can be seen on our Land-Based Safaris. The Pink Land Iguana can only be found on Wolf Volcano on Isabela, an area which is off-limits to visitors.

There are a number of sites on our Safaris which offer viewing opportunities. One is just moments after leaving Baltra Airport. Here we always play a game with our children – first person to see a land iguana gets an ice-cream and it’s normally a matter of minutes before they’ve spotted one. Other islands to find them include North Seymour and Santa Fe.

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Galapagos Marine Iguana

  • Reptile
  • LBS
  • E
  • VU

In The Voyage of the Beagle, Charles Darwin described the Marine Iguana as ‘a hideous-looking creature, of a dirty black colour, stupid and sluggish in its movements’. While it’s true they may not be the most beautiful of animals, they are excellent examples of Darwin’s evolution theory. Unlike their mainland-dwelling counterparts that live in trees and eat fruits, the marine iguana is amphibious and feeds off green (but not brown!) algae, seaweed and small crustaceans in the sea. They can swim to depths of 15 metres (50 feet) and can stay underwater for up to an hour. When underwater their body temperatures can drop as much as 20°F (6°C) which is why you often finding them basking in the sun after a swim. Their dark colour helps them absorb heat more quickly and they are able to expel any salt ingested underwater through glands near their noses.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

Marine iguanas can be found all over the coastline of Santa Cruz but one of our favorite places to see them on our Land-Based Safaris is in Tortuga Bay. Here our guests can have a private surfing lesson and may even find themselves catching a wave alongside these bizarre-looking creatures.

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Galapagos Mockingbird

  • Bird
  • GSC
  • LBS
  • E
  • LC

Contrary to popular belief, it was the Mockingbird – not the Finch – that sparked the lightbulb moment for Darwin. This relatively plain-looking bird inspired Darwin to develop one of the world’s most important scientific discoveries – the evolution of species through natural selection. His mockingbird observations, noted in 1837, hinted at the idea that species might change, a theory that would ultimately change our entire understanding of the world.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

There are six subspecies of the Galapagos mockingbird, including M.p. parvenus which is found on our island of Santa Cruz. One of the best places to observe them is in our camp, particularly at dawn. Here, you will likely hear them before you see them; in the words of Harper Lee, mockingbirds will sing their hearts out for us. You may also find them foraging for dead moths on your tent balcony at dawn or drinking drops of dew from the canvas. One of the many things we cherish at Galapagos Safari Camp is how deeply immersed in nature we are.

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Galapagos Penguin

  • Bird
  • LBS
  • E
  • EN

There are only about 2,000 individuals in the world today and they are all live here in the Galapagos Islands. The Galapagos Penguin is the only penguin found past the equatorial line, in the northern hemisphere. It is actually the only penguin that spends all of its life in the Tropics.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

The best place to see them on our Land-Based Safaris is on a day trip to Isla Bartolome, or on one of our snorkeling trips off the west coast of Isabela (See our Isabela Safari Extension)

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Galapagos Sea Lion

  • Mammal
  • LBS
  • E
  • EN

Sea lions are the largest animals you’ll find on land on your Land-Safari, or indeed on any Galapagos Tour. And yet, out of all the six species in the world, the Galapagos Sea Lion is the smallest. Adult females weigh approximately 75kg and the males, or bulls, are significantly larger, weighing up to 250kg (They can also be distinguished from the females by a bulging bump on top of their head). And yet despite their small size and limited capacity for oxygen, they are better divers than their sea lion relatives. The Galapagos sea lion can hold their breath for over ten minutes and dive to depths of almost 600m.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

You will find sea lions all of the archipelago, and don’t be surprised if you find yourself nose-to-nose with one under water. Like many of the islands’ creatures, they have no reason to fear humans. On the contrary, they can be insatiably curious and often view snorkelers as playmates. One of the more entertaining places to watch them is in the fish market of Puerto Ayora. Here you will spot them begging like Labradors at the foot of tables, much to the irritation of the local fisherman. There is, however, one sea lion that has won the hearts of all the vendors. Her name is Pancha and she has been visiting the market for 14 years now, ever since she was a pup.

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Green Sea Turtle

  • Reptile
  • LBS
  • EN

Galapagos green turtles spend most of their lives in the shallow waters surrounding the islands and occasionally at open sea. They are the only species of sea turtle to nest in the Galapagos Islands. Females usually lay their eggs at night, by digging pits in the sand with their paddle-like flippers.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

There are a number of snorkeling sites on our land-based safaris that are good for spotting green turtles, including Playa Brava at Tortuga Bay and Los Tuneles on Isabala (see Isabela Safari Extension).

MORE GALAPAGOS WILDLIFE

In addition to the Flagship Species listed above, you may also get an opportunity to encounter the following Galapagos creatures on your Land-Based Safari.

American Flamingo

  • Bird
  • LBS
  • LC

You know your Galapagos Safari is blessed when you come across flamingos! These striking birds are often found in salty lagoons just inland from the coast, feeding off algae and crustaceans, giving them their pink plumage. They build their nests in small colonies, and a single egg is incubated by both adults for a month.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

With only around 350 individuals across the archipelago it doesn’t always happen — as with most nature experiences, you never know what you’ll see – but there are a couple of saltwater lagoons on our island of Santa Cruz where they are occasionally spotted on our Land-Based Safaris. They are also found on Isabela.

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American Oystercatcher

  • Bird
  • LBS
  • LC

These distinctive looking birds were almost hunted to extinction in the 19th century but thankfully have made a successful comeback and are now frequently spotted on a number of beaches throughout the Galapagos Islands. The bird has a vivid orange beak which it uses to crack open the shells of crustaceans and molluscs and is often found running around the inter-tidal zone, pulling little creatures out of the wet sands.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

The American Oystercatcher is found on most of the Galapagos Islands, including Santa Cruz.

American Yellow Warbler

  • Bird
  • GSC
  • LBS
  • LC

This pretty little songbird is the only bright yellow bird on the islands, making it easy to identify. It is also a regular at Galapagos Safari Camp and likes to sing to our guests at breakfast time! The male, pictured here in our main lodge, has a red cap and dark reddish-brown streaks across his chest

WHERE TO SEE THEM

At Galapagos Safari Camp, and across the archipelago.

Brown Pelican

  • Bird
  • LBS
  • LC

A wonderful bird is the pelican,
His bill will hold more than his belican,
He can take in his beak
Food enough for a week,
But I’m damned if I see how the helican.

– Limerick by Dixon Lanier Merritt, 1910

The brown pelican can be found throughout the Galapagos Islands. They can spot fish from 50 feet up in the air and will dive towards the water at great speed, fully submerging themselves briefly as they scoop up their catch in their large gular pouch. At this point it’s not uncommon to see a Brown Noddy bird swiftly land upon the pelican’s head. From here, he will attempt to steal the fish from the pelican’s pouch, a behavior known as kleptoparasitism.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

You will likely encounter numerous brown pelicans on our land-based safaris. They are generally seen plunge-diving close to the shore, basking on rocks or in mangrove trees and raiding the fish market in Puerto Ayora!

Dolphin

  • Mammal
  • LBS
  • LC

There can be no other animal on our planet that elicits as much joy and excitement as a dolphin. These extraordinarily intelligent, playful and compassionate animals can teach us so much about life and how to best live it, particularly when it comes to having fun!

WHERE TO SEE THEM

On our Land-Based Safaris, we sometimes find them racing alongside the boat and on occasion are fortunate enough to enjoy their company underwater too.

Frigatebird

  • Bird
  • GSC
  • LBS
  • LC

There are two species of frigatebird in the Galapagos, the Great Frigatebird and the Magnificent Frigatebird. They are so similar in appearance that it can be hard to tell the difference between the two. The Great Frigate is actually a fraction smaller than the Magnificant Frigate, and has shiny green feathers (compared to the Magnificent’s which have a more purple hue). Both species have a reputation for haranguing other birds for morsels of food recently fished from the ocean. Not for nothing are they nicknamed “pirates of the skies”.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

Frigate birds are a common sight all over the Galapagos, particularly in the coastal areas. However, occasionally they venture inland and can be spotted from our camp, gliding high over the National Park. In addition to the shores of Santa Cruz, a good place to see them is on North Seymour Island. During the breeding season the males inflate their bright red throat sacs to attract the females, while frantically fluttering their wings. It’s quite a show!

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Galapagos Barn Owl

  • Bird
  • GSC
  • LBS
  • E
  • EN

Together with the Galapagos Short-Eared Owl, the Galapagos Barn Owl is one of only two species of owls in the Galapagos and is endemic to the Islands.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

Their nocturnal nature means that they are rarely seen by tourists but at Galapagos Safari Camp, where our guests can dine under the stars, the wildlife experience is 24/7. In recent months we’ve had a Galapagos Barn Owl take up residence in the rafters of our main lodge, and at night guests sometimes catch a glimpse of it as it perches in a tree opposite the dining veranda or takes flight into the dark, cool night.

Galapagos bat

  • Mammal
  • GSC
  • E
  • LC

Relatively little is known about the bats in the Galapagos other than the Red Bat and the Hoary Bat can both be found on Santa Cruz and San Cristobal. The Red Bat is much smaller than the Hoary Bat and flies quite low to the ground. Both hang upside down from one foot, often camouflaged under brown leaves.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

At Galapagos Safari Camp we occasionally see bats at dusk, particularly from our viewing platform. However identifying which of the two species they are has always difficult given the low levels of light, their speed, and the fact that we’ve never seen them roosting at camp.

Galapagos Dove

  • Bird
  • GSC
  • LBS
  • E
  • LC

From afar, the Galapagos Dove looks much like a regular pigeon, and it’s only when you get up close to it that you appreciate how beautiful this bird actually is with reddish-brown feathers, bright red legs and feet and a circle of brilliant blue around its eye.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

The dove can be seen across the archipelago, including the highlands of Santa Cruz where they enjoy hanging out with our guests at the pool, or so we assume.

Galapagos flycatcher

  • Bird
  • GSC
  • LBS
  • E
  • LC

These cute and courageous little birds are usually quite tame and curious, showing little fear of humans. They have been known to pluck out hairs from cows and goats for their nests, and have even been observed attempting to pluck out the hairs from tourists, although we have yet to witness this ourselves.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

They are often seen flying from branch to branch around our camp, and sometimes even find their way into the main lodge foraging for moths that have been lured indoors by the light. But it is their gutsy nature, particularly for such a diminutive creature, that endears us so much to the Galapagos Flycatcher. One researcher discovered a ‘most unusual nest’ that a Galapagos Flycatcher had created inside the hood of a raincoat in a resident’s house in Puerto Ayora. The coat had been draped over an interior wall and the Flycatcher wasted no time in building a nest and laying two eggs in it.

Galapagos Fur Seal

  • Mammal
  • LBS
  • E
  • EN

The Galapagos Fur Seal is very similar in appearance to the Sea Lion, so much so that it can be difficult to tell them apart. However, there are a few key pointers that can help distinguish them:

  • The Galapagos Fur Seal hunts at night – presumably a strategy that avoids them coming into direct competition with sea lions.
  • The Galapagos Fur Seal is about the third of the size of the Galapagos Sea Lion.
  • The Galapagos Fur Seals have big, protruding eyes which help them hunt at night, a shorter snout and ears that stick out. Their coat is also much thicker, providing them with good insulation at deeper depths. However, it also means that you are more likely to find them avoiding the sun during the day and lying in the shade.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

Galapagos Fur Seals are found throughout the archipelago, but as they only hunt at night, it is rare for visitors to see them in the water. Some of the best places to see them on our Land-Based Safaris are on the island of Bartolome and Isabela.

Galapagos Lava Lizard

  • Reptile
  • LBS
  • E
  • CE

There are seven species of lava lizards on the Galapagos Islands and they can be found across most of the archipelago including our island of Santa Cruz. They differ not so much in the way they look but in the way they behave. In the breeding season the males compete with each other by doing press-ups! It appears that each species has its own particular upper-body workout that can only be understood by its own kind.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

It is likely you will see many lava lizards on your land-based tour, as they frequent most of the visiting sites on our Safaris.

Giant Seahorse

  • Fish
  • LBS
  • VU

Also known as the Pacific Seahorse, the Giant Seahorse is the only species of seahorse found in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Approximately 12-20cm in size, they are much bigger than other seahorse species but nevertheless share many characteristics. They have skin as opposed to scales; a prehensile tail for anchoring themselves to weeds; a digestive system without a stomach; they are toothless and are able to move each eye independently of the other.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

One of the best places to see them on our Land-Based Safaris is on our snorkeling tour to Los Tuneles (see our Isabela Safari Extension)

Heron & Egret

  • Bird
  • LBS
  • LC
  • E

The Galapagos is home to many species of herons and egrets. These shore birds are frequently found along the coastlines of the islands, hunting for crabs and little fishes.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

On our land-based safaris they are commonly spotted on the islands of Santa Cruz, North Seymour, Santa Fe, South Plaza and Bartolome.

Nazca Booby

  • Bird
  • LBS
  • LC

The Nazca Booby (Sula granti) is the largest booby in the Galapagos and is often confused with the Masked Booby (Sula dactylatra). The latter has a more yellow bill (not orange) and lesser sexual dimorphism.

Much like blue-footed boobies, Nazca boobies can look clumsy on land but once airborne, the story changes. In the air they are elegant and controlled, swift and without a doubt among the best divers in the world.

Nazca boobies practice obligate siblicide – a rare but brutal display of behaviour in which the first born chick kills its younger sibling by aggressively ousting it from the nest and, in turn, into the mouths of predators.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

One of the best places to see Nazca boobies on our Land-Based Safaris is on Daphne Island – a small uninhabited islet which can be viewed from a small boat. We often incorporate a snorkeling trip at the foot of this islet as part of our Local Fishing Experience.

Another islet which is often covered with Nazca boobies is Roca Union, just off Isabela. Again this can be viewed from a small boat on our snorkeling trip to Los Tuneles (See our Isabela Safari Extension)

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Rays of Galapagos

  • Fish
  • LBS
  • VU

Fishes, such as rays, that have skeletons made up of cartilage are called cartilaginous fish or ‘Chondrichthyes’ (in Greek khondros means cartilage and ikhthus means fish). Subclasses of Chondrichthyans include Holocephali (chimaeras or ghost sharks) and Elasmobranchii (sharks and rays). This makes the ray a close relative of the shark, and a flattened elasmobranch fish that has adapted to live on the seafloor (with the exception of the Manta Ray that swims in open water).

There are some 15 species of rays in the Galapagos Islands, including Giant Manta Rays and Spotted Eagle Rays.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

Rays can be spotted all over the Islands and on our land-based safaris you will have the opportunity of seeing them from both above and below the water. We sometimes see eagle rays in Bahia Borrero and Manta Rays when snorkeling by Daphne Island.

Red-Billed Tropicbird

  • Bird
  • LBS
  • LC

These seabirds are easily identified by their long tail streamers which, in adult males, are almost double the length of their body. They are often seen diving into the water to catch fish or squid or nesting on cliffs.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

On our Land-Based Safaris they are often seen on or around the islands of Santa Cruz, North Seymour and South Plaza.

Sally Lightfoot Crab

  • Invertebrate
  • LBS
  • NT

These bright orange crustaceans are frequently spotted scuttling over the dark volcanic rocks and boulders that form many of the islands’ coastlines. In his book, The Log of the Sea, John Steinbeck described them as, ‘very beautiful, with clear brilliant colors, reds and blues and warm browns’, and also noted that ‘it is impossible to creep up on them. If you walk slowly, they move slowly ahead of you in droves. If you hurry, they hurry. When you plunge at them, they seem to disappear in little puffs of blue smoke’.

It is this remarkable agility that gives them the name ‘lightfoot’, and some believe they were named after a Caribbean dancer named Sally!

WHERE TO SEE THEM

Sally Lightfoot crabs can be found all over the Galapagos, at any time of year.

Swallow-Tailed Gull

  • Bird
  • LBS
  • LC

Swallow-tailed gulls are nocturnal (unusual amongst gulls). Around dusk most of them, with the exception of nesting gulls, head to the ocean to feed. This may be their way of avoiding competition from the larger and more aggressive birds such as boobies, frigate birds and albatrosses and/or it may be because they eat creatures that rise to the water’s surface at night. (The gulls prefer to forage during a full moon when there is a high abundance of creatures on the surface). The distinctive orange rings that circle their eyes expose a large area of the eyeball, helping them to see in the dark.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

The swallow-tailed gull can be seen across the whole of the Galapagos Islands. On our Land-Based Safaris some of the best spots include North Seymour and Bachas Beach (which we stop at as part of our Local Fishing Experience).

Whale

  • Mammal
  • LBS
  • EN

Around 24 species of whales have been recorded in the Galapagos Islands and they mainly fall into two groups: those with teeth and those that filter the plankton from water with comb-like bristles in their mouth called baleen. The best time of year to catch these magnificent mammals is in the cooler season, from July to November.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

As sightings remain highly unpredictable we do not offer dedicated whale-watching tours, but you’ll be the first to hear about a sighting if your captain or guide spots one!

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White-Tip Reef Shark

  • Fish
  • LBS
  • NT

Also known as the blunthead shark, the white tip reef shark is the most common shark species in the Galapagos Islands. During the day they are often found ‘dozing’ in caves or in shallow waters. They are quite curious creatures but very gentle and not considered a threat in any way to humans (unless they feel threatened or are under attack – fair enough!).

WHERE TO SEE THEM

On our land-based safaris, we often encounter white tip sharks when snorkeling. The sharks have a habit of hanging out in the same caves every day, so our expert guides often know where to look.

Disclaimer

As with any wildlife vacation experience, we cannot guarantee that you will see each of the species mentioned on this web page. Instead, please view this information as a guide, based on our own first-hand experiences, the experiences of our expert naturalists and the experiences of our guests.

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